OK here's one for ya...

A case of PEBKAC (Problem Exists Between Keyboard and Chair)? Tell us about your war stories!
grich
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Re: OK here's one for ya...

Post by grich » Fri Mar 25, 2016 1:05 pm

And the control cabinets of most Harris DTV transmitters have come equipped with a UPS for some time now.

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BroadcastDoc
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Re: OK here's one for ya...

Post by BroadcastDoc » Fri Mar 25, 2016 7:28 pm

Deep Thought wrote: Off I go from La Grange to Skokie, a 45 minute drive with no traffic. :shock:
No traffic? I assume you bought a lottery ticket seeing as it was your lucky day! :lol:
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Deep Thought
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Re: OK here's one for ya...

Post by Deep Thought » Fri Mar 25, 2016 10:47 pm

Probably should have said "it would be with no traffic" like at 3 AM. Normally it is 1:30. :(
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davedybas
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Re: OK here's one for ya...

Post by davedybas » Mon Mar 28, 2016 8:08 am

Glad to see someone is taking care of WCGO... The 3 phase in that local does get goofy every once and a while. But usually all you need to do is power down the Nautel for 3 minutes and she comes right back up... There is a Power Clamp surge protector out there ...maybe it's time to replace it ?

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Deep Thought
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Re: OK here's one for ya...

Post by Deep Thought » Mon Mar 28, 2016 4:31 pm

Power cycling did bring it back up but the presets changed. I want to go through all of the transmitter settings to see if anything else got scrambled.

I'm headed back up there on Weds. weather-permitting to figure out what else needs to be done, but the recent episode was complicated by that little 99 cent coin cell not holding settings when the power went blinky bouncy. It's been much better behaved with a new one of those installed.
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Re: OK here's one for ya...

Post by kcbooboo » Tue Mar 29, 2016 3:53 am

I really don't know why manufacturers continue to use batteries for maintaining user settings. There are so many serial EEPROMs available that do the same job and you never have to worry about a battery leaking or going bad. They just have to make sure the EEPROM isn't being written continuously while the unit is powered up. The Harris DAX-series of AM xmtrs did that: updated the EEPROM every second because it held the error log as well. Turns out EEPROMs have a limited number of write cycles. It may be in the millions, but with 86400 seconds or writes per day, that adds up. They had to issue a firmware fix to change that to once per minute. Still, for things like power levels that might change once per year, there just isn't a need for any battery.

Remember the "good old days" when analog mechanical pots stored power levels? No Battery Required! What a concept! Then the world went digital...

Bob M.

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Dale H. Cook
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Re: OK here's one for ya...

Post by Dale H. Cook » Tue Mar 29, 2016 5:32 am

kcbooboo wrote:I really don't know why manufacturers continue to use batteries for maintaining user settings.
Because it is simple and cheap. I carry a P-touch labeler in the Explorer and use it to put the date on anything that has had a battery replaced. The replacement interval varies with the equipment. Most standby power supplies, for example, get their gel cells replaced every three years and I never have one die because a battery has failed. Replacing batteries at regular intervals is part of PM - you just do it.
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PID_Stop
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Re: OK here's one for ya...

Post by PID_Stop » Tue Mar 29, 2016 6:47 am

kcbooboo wrote:I really don't know why manufacturers continue to use batteries for maintaining user settings.
Several reasons come to mind: first, there are instances where you want to store data to describe what the equipment was doing at the time of the outage, and that requires something to keep at least a minimal part of the logic running after the power goes out. Similarly, some equipment wants to retain its dynamic operational data -- quite apart from static user settings -- and that also needs some kind of backup power. A third reason is that some equipment likes to keep a clock running continuously.

Absolutely, non-volatile memory is a great solution for user settings, but most computer-based systems have more going on that should be kept going.

-- Jeff

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