FCC wants to make pirates walk the plank

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NECRAT
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Re: FCC wants to make pirates walk the plank

Post by NECRAT » Fri Mar 11, 2016 9:29 pm

Back to the 106.5 Bridgeport , CT pirate for a second. Here was the setup I found in 2011...Love the "Beam Tilt"

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Re: FCC wants to make pirates walk the plank

Post by Bill DeFelice » Sat Mar 12, 2016 2:29 pm

NECRAT wrote:Back to the 106.5 Bridgeport , CT pirate for a second.
That's the one I referenced earlier. It was at this location they had interfered with the local 50kw FM EAS monitor. I never bothered to DF their new location but hear them continuing so I assume they are now located far enough away that they are no longer producing a problem for the licensed station, though they're still on illegally.
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Re: FCC wants to make pirates walk the plank

Post by R. Fry » Tue Mar 22, 2016 4:56 pm

Bill DeFelice wrote:... It bothers me that at least one adult (who's also a ham and familiar with FCC regulations) had been harassed by his local field agent for using a Part 15 certified 100 milliwatt AM transmitter which is virtually impossible to install in a manner not compliant with 15.219. ...
Just to note that an AM transmitter whether or not certified for unlicensed use under FCC Part 15 AM can be installed such that it is non-compliant with the Rules for Part 15 AM.

FCC §15.219(b) limits the length/height of the conductors used in the antenna systems of such (legal) setups to a maximum of 3 meters.

Opinions have been posted on the web by their ardent believers that only the length of a short conductor (12" or so) between the r-f ground terminal of a Part 15 transmitter and the top of a relatively long, vertical conductor such as a tower, TV mast, billboard steel etc needs to be included in the 3-m length permitted by §15.219(b).

However such opinions are not supported by physics (see below), and have resulted in FCC actions against those having such installations.

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Re: FCC wants to make pirates walk the plank

Post by kc8gpd » Wed Mar 23, 2016 2:42 pm

@Rich,,

Bill was referring to Gerry Gaule and his getting busted using a talking house v5.0 which is nearly impossible to install in a non compliant manner.

it plugs into ac outlet using an oem adapter and has a built in auto antenna tuner with a 3m wire antenna. the auto tuner will not load into anything but a 3m wire as well. if it is shorter or longer it kicks back an error message.
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Re: FCC wants to make pirates walk the plank

Post by R. Fry » Thu Mar 24, 2016 6:13 am

kc8gpd: The design of the Talking House v. 5 (a.k.a. the Model 5.0 i.AM Radio Transmitter) considers the ground pin receptacle of the a-c outlet used by the transmitter to be the r-f ground for the transmitter+antenna system, when using its indoor antenna.

Here are some clips from the Installation and Operation document for the i.AM 5 transmitter at http://www.talkinghouse.com/pdfs/iamrad ... manual.pdf :

Note: make sure that the transmitter is grounded either via the three prong power transformer or ground wire connected to a screw on the rear of the unit.

Some examples of good earth grounds are:
• The center screw that holds the cover on a wall electrical outlet.
• Plumbing and water pipes (metal).
• A copper ground rod driven into the earth.


However the only one of the three suggestions above for "good earth grounds" for radio frequencies is the copper rod driven into the earth. The "ground conductor" of the a-c wiring in a building does not become an r-f ground until it reaches the physical location where it connects to an r-f ground (the copper rod driven into the earth, usually near the a-c utility entrance of the building). Until then the entire length of that conductor radiates r-f, and is part of the antenna system. Most likely the radiating length of that antenna system then would exceed FCC §15.219(b) -- which is 3 meters, maximum.*

The i.AM installation document even acknowledges this in its statement: *Please note that Part 15 FCC regulations do not allow an antenna in excess of 3 meters in length and usually the ground wire length is considered a part of this length and is added to
this total antenna measurement calculation
."

So the NEC chart in my post above applies to the i.AM system also, although the physical configuration of the conductor(s) leading to the r-f ground rod in the earth may not always lie in the vertical plane, which likely would change the field strengths shown in the NEC chart when an i.AM. system is used.

*That may have been the basis for the reported FCC action against Mr. Gaule.

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