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XDS 0 VU

Posted: Fri Jun 17, 2016 4:46 pm
by jantonuk
I want to go through the entire analog signal chain and check/set levels.

What is the standard level I should expect out of an XDS receiver for 0 VU?
Is it +4 dBm? or what?

Do different program providers use different standards?
Premiere?
ABC?
Westwood One?

you get the idea

thanks,
John

Re: XDS 0 VU

Posted: Fri Jun 17, 2016 4:50 pm
by TPT
Well, the word of the day here is "nominal."

Assuming there is someone watching levels, I would expect +4. But you know what happens when you assume something.

That's why they made AGC amplifiers.

Re: XDS 0 VU

Posted: Fri Jun 17, 2016 10:00 pm
by Shane
I find level variance from one channel or network to another. Since it all comes out of the same hole you're kind of at the network's mercy.

If you can use different outputs on the XDS for different networks, and feed them into, say, a Broadcast Tools Switcher, you can custom set the levels on the switcher inputs for each.

For all the fussing we engineers make about audio levels, by the time the processors are done with it it's all evened out anyway. At least in competitive "loudness war" markets it seems.

All that said, if you can achieve unity gain across all individual parts of the chain, so that one thing isn't making up for the previous thing's "disunity," that can only improve things. Good luck.

Re: XDS 0 VU

Posted: Fri Jun 17, 2016 10:51 pm
by Deep Thought
I can tell you from experience of making and selling subaudible tone decoders that there is no such thing as a standard network level. I designed our tone decoder to work over a 12 dB range and *even then* some networks were out of range and needed tweaking of the input level to make work.

Re: XDS 0 VU

Posted: Sat Jun 18, 2016 5:34 am
by Dale H. Cook
Shane wrote:If you can use different outputs on the XDS for different networks, and feed them into, say, a Broadcast Tools Switcher, you can custom set the levels on the switcher inputs for each.
That helps, but there can still be a great deal of level variation within one network from one program to another. There can also be considerable variation within a program - the network spots voiced by Michael Savage seem to run about 10 dB lower than most of his program.