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Routing Internet Traffic

Posted: Wed Mar 25, 2020 8:37 pm
by Shane
I’m involved in a work from home project and have a question for the group.

My problem is that when the neighbors get home around 6pm, it seems they clog up things such that my upload speed, which is supposed to be ‘up to’ 10Mbps according to the suckers at Cox, sinks to about 3M - or zero right this moment according to speedtest.net. This is when going thru the Cox Omaha server(s).

On speedtest.net, you can select a different server. Any one I select seems to hover around 10, sometimes a little more. Cox has a speedtest kluge on their website which only gives you Cox servers. On this app, I can select places like Wichita or Atlanta and see the 10s while still only scoring 3 or less on the local server.

Is there a way to route traffic such that it goes thru one of the better functioning points rather than Cox’s choice? The issue is lousing up outgoing audio but incoming audio is mostly fine.

I called myself through the system we are using to hear what my audio was like. While talking and quite broken up, I started a speed test to another server (I think it was Cox Wichita) and the audio pretty much cleaned up - right up to the moment the test ceased. Could have been a coincidence but I wonder.

I had this happen at a remote i was doing once about 2 years ago and since I was just supervising, I kept running speed tests to try and keep the server connection. Have no idea if i was really accomplishing anything but it seemed to work until I got tired of it.

Any thoughts?

Re: Routing Internet Traffic

Posted: Thu Mar 26, 2020 2:55 am
by davek
Unfortunately once the packets leave your network (or anything under your direct control), you don't have much control over the path they take (much like how you don't have a say over the path your mail takes when delivered by the postal service).

Re: Routing Internet Traffic

Posted: Thu Mar 26, 2020 10:17 am
by carver
the fact is that in my experience, the operator channels are rarely loaded.
therefore, there is no point in routing.

but what you say is similar to legacy ADSL technology.
look at the "speed" of your modem, most likely you will find the dependence of the quality of the line and the speed of your Internet.
in the evening hours, many modems try operate at maximum speed, there is a lot of noise in the cable, and the speed drops.

this is the problem of the last mile.
in my country(not Nauru now), such operators have long been closed.
Only the optics in the house remain.
cost around $7-8 for 100Mb per month.

Re: Routing Internet Traffic

Posted: Thu Mar 26, 2020 5:29 pm
by Deep Thought
If you manage 10 megabits up on a different speedtest server while others are a lot lower it isn't because of your local connection or your neighbors. If that was the case it'd be the same no matter which test you used.

I suspect that Cox may have some peers which are clogged up and which one of those you get will depend on the destination site. Run some traceroutes to see how things change between different websites.

Re: Routing Internet Traffic

Posted: Thu Mar 26, 2020 9:25 pm
by techboywi
Just because the speedtest.net results are faster on other sites, it doesn't necessarily mean other traffic will be as fast. As others said, once the packet your homeome network and enters COX's, you have no control over it at all.. Any chance you can up your speed?

Re: Routing Internet Traffic

Posted: Thu Mar 26, 2020 9:27 pm
by techboywi
Deep Thought wrote:
Thu Mar 26, 2020 5:29 pm
I suspect that Cox may have some peers which are clogged up and which one of those you get will depend on the destination site. Run some traceroutes to see how things change between different websites.
traceroute will only help SOME, just by looking at the number of hops. But, with the way some routers prioritize ICMP packets, the results in any traceroute can be misleading

Re: Routing Internet Traffic

Posted: Thu Mar 26, 2020 9:49 pm
by Deep Thought
techboywi wrote:
Thu Mar 26, 2020 9:27 pm
traceroute will only help SOME, just by looking at the number of hops. But, with the way some routers prioritize ICMP packets, the results in any traceroute can be misleading
I mentioned that mostly to illustrate where the path goes through Cox's network. The latency figure really isn't reliable until you get to the end point.

Re: Routing Internet Traffic

Posted: Fri Mar 27, 2020 2:48 pm
by carver
don't forget that speedtest is a toy for mobiles and teenagers.
real broadcasters - use iperf.