Italian Made amplifier

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REW
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Italian Made amplifier

Post by REW » Tue Jan 02, 2018 12:27 pm

I had a station call me to check on there transmitter site. Just wanted to make sure it was working properly going into the new year. He had a Archimede 3000 Power Amp made by ITALAB, www.italab.it. Anyone know anything about this amp. Seemed to be working good and making 2800 watts on a Bird meter. Also looked at it on a spectrum anaylizer and it looked to be meeting the harmonic emission requirements with several DB to spare. Just wondered if anyone had any experiences with one of these.

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kkiddkkidd
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Re: Italian Made amplifier

Post by kkiddkkidd » Wed Jan 03, 2018 10:08 am

REW wrote:
Tue Jan 02, 2018 12:27 pm
I had a station call me to check on there transmitter site. Just wanted to make sure it was working properly going into the new year. He had a Archimede 3000 Power Amp made by ITALAB, www.italab.it. Anyone know anything about this amp. Seemed to be working good and making 2800 watts on a Bird meter. Also looked at it on a spectrum anaylizer and it looked to be meeting the harmonic emission requirements with several DB to spare. Just wondered if anyone had any experiences with one of these.
Nothing here on that one specifically. A lot of the low cost (and usually re, re, rebranded) broadcast RF equipment seems to come from Italy. Some of it is pretty good. Some not so much.
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Kevin C. Kidd CSRE/AMD
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KK Broadcast Engineering
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REW
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Re: Italian Made amplifier

Post by REW » Wed Jan 03, 2018 2:28 pm

This must be one of the good units. I was told it has been in service for over 3 years with no problems. I had to blow some dust out of the heat sink so I decided to lift the lid and take a look around. It had Three 1200 watt pallets and 3 Eaton 48 volt 30 amp switching power supplies.

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Deep Thought
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Re: Italian Made amplifier

Post by Deep Thought » Wed Jan 03, 2018 3:41 pm

You might want to check to make sure this thing is type approved. Not like the FCC checks until there is an interference complaint but it's a good thing to know.
Mark Mueller • Mueller Broadcast Design • La Grange, IL • http://www.muellerbroadcastdesign.com

REW
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Re: Italian Made amplifier

Post by REW » Wed Jan 03, 2018 4:22 pm

I did check on type approval and I dont think it is. I have been told that if you have the proper equipment you can run the tests yourself and certify it as meeting the FCC requirements. I dont know if that would work or not but it cant hurt.

BigRed
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Re: Italian Made amplifier

Post by BigRed » Thu Jan 04, 2018 1:46 pm

Unless the equipment is around 20-years old, or older, it won't be Type "Accepted" or Type "Approved". Those processes went out the window somewhere in the early to mid '90's. They were replaced by the Certification/Verification/DoC/Supplier DoC/TCB system, depending on the part of the Rules that the equipment is going to be licensed for.

And while transmitters licensed under Part 73 of the Rules could be Certificated, 73.1660(a)(1) Acceptability of Broadcast Transmitters only required "verification" which means that the manufacturer only had to make the requisite measurements to "verify" the transmitter being sold operated within the parameters set forth in the requisite sections of the Rules, no paperwork to be filed (unless the FCC requested such for some reason) and no FCC ID# issued. Many manufacturers did go through with the Certification process anyhow so you may well find FCC ID numbers on equipment nameplates; an example is the Harris Z series of FM transmitters.

And now that is no longer valid. The current language of 73.1660(a)(1) Acceptability of Broadcast Transmitters only requires a Supplier Declairation of Conformity, basically a letter from the "responsible party" saying that the equipment meets the requisite FCC requirements; a copy of which should be included in the equipment's manual. Again, no FCC ID. (I installed one GatesAir Flexiva FLX and two GatesAir Flexiva FAX-HP transmitters in the past six-month and no FCC ID on any of their nameplates.)

But also keep in mind that 73.1690 Equipment Performance Measurements is still in effect so all those transmitters need to be checked out when they're first installed (and at other times and under other conditions). So from that I would conclude that if one were to "proof" the transmitter and find that it passes the requisite requirements that would make it legit. (I usually do conducted measurements for occupied bandwidth, 2nd harmonic, 3rd harmonic, a sweep from 9-kHz to the 10th harmonic in several segments, carrier frequency and output power; environmental performance and radiated measurements are a lot harder to deal with so I fall back to the Supplier DoC or the Certification for those "validations".)

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