Transmitter Nitrogen Issue

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taylorengineer
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Re: Transmitter Nitrogen Issue

Post by taylorengineer » Fri Mar 23, 2018 2:02 pm

As others have suggested...get some soapy liquid and baste every fitting you can get to on the ground. Check the regulator itself and it's connection to the nitrogen bottle. I have also had the regulator creating leaks.
If the line will build pressure then of course, you're going to feel outflow when you take the nitrogen connection loose. This only tells you the leak is not massive...bullet holes and lightning strikes usually result in a line that will not pressure up at all.
You might try turning off the valve feeding your waveguide on the nitrogen distribution feeder. If you maintain pressure in front of the shutoff but the waveguide losses all pressure then you know where to look next.

jbarth200
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Re: Transmitter Nitrogen Issue

Post by jbarth200 » Fri Mar 23, 2018 2:26 pm

taylorengineer wrote:
Fri Mar 23, 2018 2:02 pm
As others have suggested...get some soapy liquid and baste every fitting you can get to on the ground. Check the regulator itself and it's connection to the nitrogen bottle. I have also had the regulator creating leaks.
If the line will build pressure then of course, you're going to feel outflow when you take the nitrogen connection loose. This only tells you the leak is not massive...bullet holes and lightning strikes usually result in a line that will not pressure up at all.
You might try turning off the valve feeding your waveguide on the nitrogen distribution feeder. If you maintain pressure in front of the shutoff but the waveguide losses all pressure then you know where to look next.
Thanks! That's exactly what I thought about today. I went out to my site with the problem, started working on the regulator connections, I closed the regulator and turned on the tank, didn't hear any airflow so determined the connection to the tank was more than likely solid. When I started messing with my output regulator connection a little more, the tubing on the connector just came apart, I have a feeling this was my issue, I went to Grainger and have replacement parts arriving on Monday. I will keep this updated if I find out that's my problem. Wish I woukd have closed my manifold gauge prior to my cable coming apart to confirm that or not but it seems that may be it. Thanks everyone for the suggestions, if this doesn't work..bubbles it is.

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Deep Thought
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Re: Transmitter Nitrogen Issue

Post by Deep Thought » Fri Mar 23, 2018 4:01 pm

jbarth200 wrote:
Fri Mar 23, 2018 2:26 pm
bubbles it is.
One place to find leak detection fluid is in the plumbing section of your favorite hardware purveyor. It'll be next to the black pipe and gas fittings. This stuff is specifically made to help you find leaks.
Mark Mueller • Mueller Broadcast Design • La Grange, IL • http://www.muellerbroadcastdesign.com

rich wood
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Re: Transmitter Nitrogen Issue

Post by rich wood » Sun Mar 25, 2018 6:41 am

Do you have "waveguide" or coax. Waveguide is presurrized at a very low level with a high flow dehydrator. Coax can use nitrogen or a dehydrator. If you have waveguide there are pressure windows that are easy to blow out and cause a massive leak. Please confirm what type of equipment,, send photo.
Thanks

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PID_Stop
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Re: Transmitter Nitrogen Issue

Post by PID_Stop » Mon Mar 26, 2018 6:47 am

jbarth200 wrote:
Fri Mar 23, 2018 11:27 am
Okay that makes sense, but in terms of a leak in my waveguide, if I did indeed have a leak, would any pressurized air in the waveguide escape through the leak. So in theory when I remove my nitrogen input to the waveguide, I wouldn't feel air pushing back out if I had a leak?
Depends on how big the leak is. An infinitely big leak will prevent any pressure from building up at all; a small leak will let you approach the target pressure, but it will gradually drop after you stop adding gas. A car tire does the same thing: if the leak is catastrophic (say, the bead isn't sealed against the rim), you won't be able to build up any pressure, but a slow leak will let you pump the thing up to normal pressure -- it just won't stay there.

Jeff

jbarth200
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Re: Transmitter Nitrogen Issue

Post by jbarth200 » Mon Mar 26, 2018 12:28 pm

rich wood wrote:
Sun Mar 25, 2018 6:41 am
Do you have "waveguide" or coax. Waveguide is presurrized at a very low level with a high flow dehydrator. Coax can use nitrogen or a dehydrator. If you have waveguide there are pressure windows that are easy to blow out and cause a massive leak. Please confirm what type of equipment,, send photo.
Thanks
Waveguide, I'm thinking of coming out one night and turning my RF off and taking a look to see if any pressure windows are gone on the waveguide on the ground. I have added some photos.
Attachments
1522088873992374732049.jpg
Regulator
15220887731701716700594.jpg
Wave guide

grich
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Re: Transmitter Nitrogen Issue

Post by grich » Mon Mar 26, 2018 12:51 pm

jbarth200 wrote:
Mon Mar 26, 2018 12:28 pm
...I'm thinking of coming out one night and turning my RF off and taking a look to see if any pressure windows are gone on the waveguide on the ground...
I'd do a bubble test first before going through all that trouble.

Also, is that tank chained to the wall?

jbarth200
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Re: Transmitter Nitrogen Issue

Post by jbarth200 » Mon Mar 26, 2018 12:56 pm

grich wrote:
Mon Mar 26, 2018 12:51 pm
jbarth200 wrote:
Mon Mar 26, 2018 12:28 pm
...I'm thinking of coming out one night and turning my RF off and taking a look to see if any pressure windows are gone on the waveguide on the ground...
I'd do a bubble test first before going through all that trouble.

Also, is that tank chained to the wall?
On my way to buy bubbles now, it is not.

grich
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Re: Transmitter Nitrogen Issue

Post by grich » Mon Mar 26, 2018 1:11 pm

That tank needs to be chained or strapped tight to a wall, bollard, or other structure so it can't fall over. If it falls over and the valve gets knocked off, BAD things will happen. Plenty of online videos, and even a Mythbusters segment on what happens.

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NECRAT
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Re: Transmitter Nitrogen Issue

Post by NECRAT » Mon Mar 26, 2018 6:40 pm

I know my previous post was 100% ignored on this topic , but hopefully you'll pay attention to this one.

OSHA requires those tanks be secured to the wall or structure.

If the Tank is not secured to the wall, it MUST have the safety cap on and tight on top.

If you tip a tank over, and the valve pops, it becomes a missile that can go through concrete walls.
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grich
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Re: Transmitter Nitrogen Issue

Post by grich » Mon Mar 26, 2018 10:58 pm

NECRAT wrote:
Mon Mar 26, 2018 6:40 pm
I know my previous post was 100% ignored on this topic , but hopefully you'll pay attention to this one.

OSHA requires those tanks be secured to the wall or structure.

If the Tank is not secured to the wall, it MUST have the safety cap on and tight on top.

If you tip a tank over, and the valve pops, it becomes a missile that can go through concrete walls.
And when you move the tank, of course close the valve, remove the hose and screw the safety cap on.

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