Laser projector and taking photo of displayed picture

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Bosko Managarovski
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Laser projector and taking photo of displayed picture

Post by Bosko Managarovski » Thu Jun 07, 2018 3:57 am

Hi experts,
Recently our rentl company bought laser projectors the we used first time on a public event.
The projected picture was ok for the audience, but later on the digital photos it looks like color distorted that is a problem for the client (and company in the same time).
Any explanation, camera setting or advise?

thanks,
Bosko

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Dale H. Cook
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Re: Laser projector and taking photo of displayed picture

Post by Dale H. Cook » Thu Jun 07, 2018 8:52 am

This is more or less the same problem as taking a photo of a TV or computer monitor image. Your camera is not synchronized with the projector and the image is distorted. Why do you need a photo, and how will it be used? That may determine your alternatives.
Dale H. Cook, Contract Engineer, Roanoke/Lynchburg, VA
http://plymouthcolony.net/starcityeng/index.html

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PID_Stop
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Re: Laser projector and taking photo of displayed picture

Post by PID_Stop » Thu Jun 07, 2018 10:07 am

You can ease the problem by using a camera that can operate either manually or with shutter priority: make sure that the shutter speed is slower than the frame rate -- e.g., 1/30 or 1/15 of a second. Use a tripod for stability, and pick a time when the video on the screen is not moving.

Jeff

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Dale H. Cook
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Re: Laser projector and taking photo of displayed picture

Post by Dale H. Cook » Thu Jun 07, 2018 11:12 am

To add to Jeff's reply, the exposure should be the same as an integer multiple of the inverse of the frame rate. For example, a typical computer monitor refresh rate is 60 Hz. An exposure of 1/60 would probably work but an exposure of 1/30 might be a little better if the shutter speed and the refresh rate are not close enough. You may get the best results with the longest exposure that does not cause blurring from motion.

In addition to using a tripod another consideration is any vibration that may be induced in the camera when snapping the shutter. The better digital cameras have image stabilization, but despite having that in my Pentax K-70 I often shoot on a tripod with wireless shutter release to get the best image.
Dale H. Cook, Contract Engineer, Roanoke/Lynchburg, VA
http://plymouthcolony.net/starcityeng/index.html

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PID_Stop
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Re: Laser projector and taking photo of displayed picture

Post by PID_Stop » Thu Jun 07, 2018 11:34 am

Dale H. Cook wrote:
Thu Jun 07, 2018 11:12 am
In addition to using a tripod another consideration is any vibration that may be induced in the camera when snapping the shutter. The better digital cameras have image stabilization, but despite having that in my Pentax K-70 I often shoot on a tripod with wireless shutter release to get the best image.
Or if you don't have a remote shutter release, you can use the self timer to avoid jarring the camera.

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